Should you go to University? Part 1

More recently I’ve decided I want to gear my blog toward helping people and using my own personal life experiences to stop you all from making the same mistakes I’ve made. One of my biggest life decisions was in 2013, applying to study English Language at The University of Manchester,  however at the time, I had no idea how important this decision was.

One of my biggest life decisions was in 2013, applying to study English Language at The University of Manchester,  however at the time, I had no idea how important this decision was.

All my life it was ingrained in me that university was the path I would follow, whether consciously or not, my surroundings / environment had pushed me in that direction. Both of my parents were very successful at university, as were their parents. Unversity had become somewhat of a family tradition, and at seventeen years old part of me felt I would be letting the side down if I did not go.

So in Year 13 I applied to university and sent off my UCAS application with no real thought as to whether this was actually the right career path for me. I think at the time I was just going with the flow, as I had no idea what I wanted I wanted to do with my life and part of me thought that uni would help me bide my time. I won’t lie it has done just that, now in my second year and half way through my degree, I have a much better idea of what I’m going to do in the real world.

Nevertheless, did I need to pay £9,000 a year for tuition fees, £5,000 a year accommodation fees, £3,000 a year maintenance fees. Others may disagree but I feel this is a huge yearly sum for ‘biding your time’. What makes matters worse is that I feel as though I have chosen the complete wrong degree. Part of me feels like it is isn’t a respected enough degree, and at the end of these three years, is a degree in English Language going to be worth that huge investment?

What makes matters worse is that I feel as though I have chosen the complete wrong degree. Part of me feels like it is isn’t a respected enough degree, and at the end of these three years, is a degree in English Language going to be worth that huge investment?

The reason seventeen-year-old me chose this degree was because I was good at it during A-Level, I didn’t particularly enjoy it and I also had no real understanding that when it comes to doing a degree, English Language was almost seen as a ‘doss’ subject. It was only until it was too late that this realisation had actually hit me.

So what I’d want you to take away for anyone reading this, is to make sure the degree that you’re studying is (a) something you actually enjoy, I cannot stress that enough, and (b) if you’re genuinely passionate about the subject, especially those seen as a ‘doss’, make sure they are your passion. As when you fall into the real world, the majority of humanities degrees fall short.

Now I’m not saying you should never study a humanities degree, I think the arts are some of the most important things in life. But what you need to bare in mind is that employers are not realistically looking for graduates with a degree in History for example. They are looking for people with experience in the real world, who may not have gone to university but have worked in their desired field for a number of years, or actual graduates themselves who have degrees in Engineering or Medicine.

 

There is so much more I want to talk about on the subject, but for now we can just call this part one.

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